Slogging Through

Normally, when I think of a story idea, I typically sit down and write it and usually, at the MOST, within 2 weeks, I have a first draft. Doesn’t mean it’s a GOOD draft, but it is done and usually has something close to a story arc.

This time, I have a story that’s very rough in my head, that I immediately liked and wanted to write, but I’m having a hard time slogging through the first quarter of it and really understanding where it’s going. 

Two things came up today that helped me immensely.

1. Operation Awesome had a blog post up today called Where’s the Love about how some books don’t come as easily as others and sometimes you have to let first drafts be skeletons just to get it out, and you can work on filling in the guts and the heart and the skin later. It was awesome and a relief to read.

2. Malinda Lo (who is a personal hero of mine for writing such incredible stories with LGBTQ characters that are never ABOUT the characters being LGBTQ, guh. Go read Ash and Huntress right now. RIGHT NOW) said on Twitter that she was slogging through a part of the story that was hard for her right now. She said it was easy at this point to give up. I asked her what her advice was because I was hitting the same point in my story. She said that slogging through was the best way, and once you did it once, it became easier because you knew you could do it. 

So. Tonight, I’m slogging through and this is my screensaver.

Image

You can follow Malinda on Twitter at twitter.com/malindalo and me on twitter at twitter.com/bibliogato

 

Any other tips for slogging through a story that doesn’t come to you in one giant wave of inspiration?

 

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5 thoughts on “Slogging Through

  1. lottieeaton says:

    I went to see a talk by a famous Irish author, Dermot Bolger a week or two ago and he said that if you’re having trouble getting through a part of a story that sometimes skipping to a part that you know you’ll enjoy writing can help. It gives you a chance to have some fun with it and to just write instead of staring at the word count while you write.
    Personally I don’t think that would work for me, but my boyfriend is using this method at the moment and he’s nearly finished his first draft after writing the end and then going back to finish the middle off.
    It just might be an idea to consider if it gets too much or too slow at any point.

    • Katie L says:

      I think that works for me. I rarely write linearly…one of the stories I wrote last year I wrote the last scene first and worked backwards. The story read straight through, I didn’t mess with timelines or anything, but in my head, everything I was writing was to explain the first thing I had written.

      • lottieeaton says:

        You’re so lucky that that works for you, I would love to be able to hop to a part of my novel that fascinates me, but I just can’t do it! No matter how stuck I am at a particular part or how difficult writing is becoming I just can’t do it at all! I’m very jealous of people who can do it, it would be insanely useful at times!

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